Whole Foods Plant Based Salad Dressing

These salad dressings have cannellini beans as a base
These salad dressings have cannellini beans as a base

My mother in law is really cool about my family’s switch to a whole foods plant based diet.  We went to her house for dinner this week and she graciously cooked a vegetarian meal for us.  She asked me to provide salad dressing for a mixed greens salad.  I made these two salad dressing recipes from the “Forks Over Knives Cookbook.”

Store-bought salad dressing in particular of all processed foods is a trap.  You start with a big bowl of healthy greens and veggies, then add salad dressing that is really just oil and sugar.  Most dressings are sweetened with sugar and contain oil, which is always 100% pure fat.  Even many “fat-free” salad dressings use label manipulation to hide their oil content.  After covering your green salad in oil you go ahead and add some sulfured and sugar-sweetened dried fruit like Craisins, and then you top it off with goat cheese or shredded cheddar.  This was a cholesterol-free dish until you added the cheese, which is really just meat in another form.  I did a true double-take in the grocery store when, in the produce section, I walked by this product:

Before eating, ask yourself: how can this meat sit in the middle of the produce section, unrefrigerated?  Do you want to eat the substance that makes this possible?
Before eating this product, ask yourself: how can this meat sit in the middle of the produce section, unrefrigerated? Do you want to eat the substance that makes this possible?

According to the website for this “100% real bacon” I should use this item to top my salad.  I can’t believe that meat got into the produce section.  I had daydreams of going grocery shopping with my little girl when she gets a bit older and telling her that she can pick out any item she wants in the fruit and veggie section of the store, and we would take it home, cook and eat it.  Now there’s an ultra-processed pig meat product available in my grocery store safe zone.  It makes me a little sad.

As an aside, I visited the Oscar Mayer website and looked up this product.  Check it out here or by clicking the image of bacon.  When I clicked the nutritional information link on their site I was directed to this:

No nutritional information.
No nutritional information.
Ingredients for cilantro lime dressing are in the blender!
Ingredients for cilantro lime dressing are in the blender!

Cilantro Lime Dressing

Ingredients

1 Cup cooked cannellini beans, or (1) 15oz can drained and rinsed

2 Cups fresh cilantro, leaves and tender stems

1 Cup Italian parsley leaves

1/4 Cup tahini

(1) 4oz Can diced green chiles

2 Tablespoons low sodium soy sauce

1 Teaspoon chili powder

1/4 Teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 Cloves garlic, peeled and minced

Zest and juice of 2 limes

In a blender, combine the ingredients and 1 cup of water.  Blend on high until smooth.

Maple Mustard Dressing

Ingredients:

1 Cup cooked cannellini beans, or (1) 15oz can drained and rinsed

2 Tablespoons tahini

2 Tablespoons mustard

2 Tablespoons nutritional yeast

2 Tablespoons low sodium soy sauce

1 Tablespoon 100% pure maple syrup

Zest and juice of 1 lemon

Combine the ingredients in a blender with 1/4 cup of water and blend on high until smooth.  Add more water as needed to achieve a smooth consistency.

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Christina says:

    Can you recommend an oil free tahini brand?

    1. Chelsea says:

      We use Joyva sesame tahini. It does not have any added oil, however sesame seeds are naturally very oily. You’ll find tons of free oil sitting on top of the tahini. I recommend pouring off that excess oil instead of mixing it in if you’d like to create a lower-fat version. We do this with our peanut butter too. Hope that helps.

  2. Amanda says:

    How long does the Maple/Mustard dressing last? I have leftover I put in the fridge, but wondered your thoughts on freshness!

    1. Chelsea says:

      It should be good to use for a week or more in the fridge. Certainly there should be no food safety concern since it’s made of mustard, tahini, etc., ingredients that are shelf stable or live in the fridge for weeks normally anyway. For freshness I would use before 7 days. 🙂

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